Foods High in Vitamin E

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About Vitamin E

Vitamin E is fat-soluble and functions as an antioxidant in the body. It helps prevent harmful clotting from occurring in the blood vessels by widening them and aids the immune system of the body. Foods high in vitamin E represent a variety of food groups allowing them to easily be included in almost any eating plan.

According to the Office of Dietary Supplements, the recommended daily amounts of vitamin E are as follows:

  • Children up to 6 months of age: 4 mg/6IU
  • Children 7 to 12 months of age: 5 mg/7.5 IU
  • Children 1 to 3 years of age: 6 mg/ 9 IU
  • Children 4 to 8 years of age: 7 mg/10.4 IU
  • Children 9 to 13 years of age: 11 mg/ 16.4 IU
  • Teens and Adults, ages 14 and up, including pregnancy: 15 mg/22.4 IU
  • Lactating teens and adult women, ages 14 and up: 19 mg/ 28.4 IU

Sunflower Seeds

Sunflower seeds are rich in vitamin E containing 18 mg, or 90 percent of the recommended daily value for the nutrient. Other nutrients found in sunflower seeds in high amounts include vitamin B1, manganese, magnesium, copper, tryptophan and selenium. A 1/4-cup serving of raw sunflower seeds contains 205 calories.

Almonds

A 1/4-cup serving of dry roasted almonds contain 206 calories and provides provide 45 percent of the recommended daily value, or 9 mg, of vitamin E.They are also a great source of manganese, magnesium and tryptophan.

Spinach

A 1-cup serving of cooked spinach contains 41 calories and 19 percent of the recommended daily value for vitamin E. This comes from the 4 mg of vitamin E contained in that serving. Other nutrients found in high amounts in spinach include vitamins K and A, manganese, folate, magnesium, iron, vitamin C, vitamin B2, potassium and calcium.

Papaya

One papaya contains 119 calories and provides 17 percent of the daily recommended value of vitamin E, or 3 mg. Other nutrients found in papaya include vitamin C, folate, potassium, dietary fiber, vitamin A and vitamin K.

Swiss Chard

A 1-cup serving of cooked Swiss chard contains 35 calories and provides 17 percent of the recommended daily value of vitamin E, or 3 mg. Swiss chard is a nutrient-rich vegetable that is also high in vitamins K, A and C; magnesium, manganese, potassium, iron and dietary fiber.

Mustard Greens

A 1-cup serving of cooked mustard greens contains 21 calories and 3 mg of vitamin E, providing 14 percent of the recommended daily value. Mustard greens are also high in vitamins K, A and C, manganese, folate, calcium, tryptophan, and dietary fiber.

Turnip Greens

Turnip greens make a great choice for adding vitamin E and other nutrients to your diet. Turnip greens contain 12 percent of the recommended daily value for vitamin E, coming from the 2 mg it contains in one serving (1 cup cooked). One serving has 29 calories and is loaded with nutrients such as vitamin K, vitamin C, vitamin A, folate, manganese, calcium, dietary fiber and copper.

References

Vitamin E. The World’s Healthiest Foods. https://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=111

Vitamin E. Consumer Fact Sheet. National Institutes of Health: Office of Dietary Supplements. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminE-Consumer.asp

Vitamin E. Micronutrient Information Center. Linus Pauling Institute. Oregon State University. https://lpi.oregonstate.edu/infocenter/vitamins/vitaminE/