Forms of Sodium: Alternative Terms for Sodium

Forms of Sodium: Alternative Terms for Sodium
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Not Just in Your Saltshaker

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Perhaps not surprisingly, salt is not just in your saltshaker anymore. In fact, you will find salt in places you might not even think of!

Sodium Alginate

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This flavorless compound is derived from the cell walls of brown seaweed, specifically kelp native to Ireland, Scotland, North and South America, and other cold water regions. It is soluble in both hot and cold water and acts as a thickener. It is often found in foods needing an emulsifying agent, as well as some tablets used for indigestion.

Sodium Ascorbate

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A combination of sodium mixed with ascorbic acid (vitamin C) this water soluble salt is believed to have substantial health benefits. It is usually sold as a chew-able or powdered nutritional supplement, although it can be found as an additive in some foods. Many people choose to use the supplements because of the benefit of obtaining large amounts of vitamin C with little risk of stomach upset. This is because the sodium contained acts as a buffer for the ascorbic acid, making it more digestible.

Sodium Bicarbonate

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More commonly recognized as baking soda, sodium bicarbonate is highly sought after for its versatility. Used in baking because of its unique leavening properties, and beverages because of its effervescent qualities, you will also find it in facial cleansers and beauty products. Have odors in your kitchen sink? Baking soda has odor neutralizing properties and is often used to eliminate household odors as well.

Sodium Benzoate

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Highly acidic, this type of salt is capable of fighting off bacteria and fungi that can cause food to spoil. Sodium benzoate is used as a preservative in foods of a pH of 3.6 or higher. This is because approximately seventy-five per cent of people who eat a food containing sodium benzoate can taste it. It can be derived through artificial means, but is also found naturally in some fruits and spices. Ironically, naturally derived sodium benzoate is not an effective preservative.

Sodium Caseinate

Used in pharmaceutical applications, sodium caseinate can also be found in foods and other items that require both smooth and easy distribution of a binder as well as high binding ability of oils and waters.

Sodium Chloride

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Sodium chloride is, simply put, table salt. It is the combination of sodium and chlorine. Scientifically put it looks like this:

2Na(s) + Cl2(g) ——-2NaCl(s)

Sodium Citrate

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Commonly known as sour salt, this sour tasting salt is used as a food additive and preservative. Because it dissolves instantly, it can also be found in some drinks that have citrus flavoring as it adds a sour and salty flavor.

Sodium Hydroxide

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More commonly recognized as lye or caustic soda, sodium hydroxide is a highly toxic. It is found in aquarium supplies as well as industrial solvents and cleaners. If poisoning occurs due to exposure to one’s skin, eyes or lungs, seek medical care immediately.

Sodium Saccharin

Discovered accidentally in 1879 by Remsen and Fahlberg, saccharin is believed to taste one hundred times sweeter then sugar. Highly controversial as a result of its carcinogenic component when administered to laboratory rats, sodium saccharin, or saccharin as it is more commonly recognized, has been utilized as a sweetener for over one hundred years, primarily because it provides a substantial amount of sweetness without added fat or calories.

Sodium Stearoyl Lactylate

Sodium stearoyl lactylate can be found in many baked products such as breads, cookies, and crackers. Because of its unique ability to condition dough and bind liquids that would, under normal circumstances separate, it can also be found in foods such as sour cream, salad dressing, soup and even cheese.

Sodium Sulfite

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Sodium sulfite can be found in both food and non food applications, however it is mostly used in the textile industry to preserve photographic chemicals, textile and leather products and as chemical agents and dyes.

Disodium Phosphate

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A water soluble compound, disodium phosphate is used in the manufacturing of water softeners, detergents, textiles, dyeing and electroplating.

MSG

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MSG, which is sodium salt combined with the amino acid glutamate, is also referred to as monosodium glutamate, hydrolyzed vegetable protein, HVP, yeast extract, and autolyzed protein. It is most commonly found in Japanese and Chinese foods. Highly controversial, MSG is believed to cause imbalances in the brain and is currently being investigated with respect to its connection to numerous neurological diseases and conditions including fibromyalgia, multiple sclerosis, brain cancer, depression, and ADHD.

Trisodium Phosphate

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Referred to as TSP or tribasic sodium phosphate in the industry, trisodium phosphate is used primarily for manufacturing water softeners, as well as detergents and textiles.

Na

The final term for salt covered in this article is Na. Simply put, Na is sodium. It is considered a member of the alkali metal group and is found primarily in salt water. It will burn a lovely yellow flame.

When you think about it, forms of sodium can be found all around us. Alternative terms for sodium are important to know if you are on a salt reduced diet, or are just curious as all the sources and uses of sodium in our environment today.

References

Spherification: - www.willpowder.com

Live Strong - www.livestrong.com

Sodium Bicarbonate - www.chemicalland21.com

What Is Sodium Benzoate - brainz.org

Caseinates - www.eriefoods.com

Sodium + Chlorine: Pass the Salt, Please - www.angelo.edu

Medline Plus - www.nlm.gov

Great Vista Chemicals - www.greatvistachemicals.com

Narural Health - www.naturalhealth.com