About Corn Allergy Symptoms and Food Allergy Treatment

Like many food allergies, symptoms of an allergic reaction to corn include itching skin, rash and swelling. Nauseau and vomiting might set in after you eat a food that contains corn, followed by wheezing and difficulty breathing if the allergy is severe. You could develop anaphylaxis, a severe system-wide allergic reaction. Don’t ignore a simple allergy to corn.

Avoidance

The best, and most effective, treatment for corn allergy is avoidance. Corn allergy symptoms develop when your immune system identifies the proteins in corn as a problem. Your system manufactures an antibody called IgE; every time you eat something containing corn or come into contact with any substance containing corn, you experience an allergic reaction.

If your doctor suspects you have a corn allergy, he may send you to an allergist, who will test you (blood test or a skin test) for a possible corn allergy. If you do have a corn allergy, he will give you a list of non-food items and foods that contain corn, even in tiny amounts.

Once you have been diagnosed with this allergy, your shopping habits have to change; you need to learn to read food labels at the store to identify which items contain corn. Food allergy treatments exist for your corn allergy, but they are not cures.

Food Items Containing Corn

Foods containing corn are now off-limits to you. Your allergy may become progressively worse each time you eat something with corn, so that it could eventually become a life-threatening condition.

The foods to avoid include: most commercial soups, vegetable soups, cold cuts, ham, sausages and hot dogs. Take peanut butter, corn syrup, fried and breaded foods, fish sticks, cheese, chop suey, corn meal, chili, cheese spreads, mixed vegetables (frozen and canned) rice or fried potatoes that use corn oil, polenta, pork and beans, succotash, graham crackers, corn oil, tacos, creamed vegetables, baking mixes, certain pancake mixes, gravy with thickened corn starch, vegetable oil, breads that have been dusted with corn meal, popcorn, English muffins, tamales, salad dressings, dates and other fruit confections, maize, sherbets and ice creams, corn fritters, canned or frozen fruits that have been sweetened with corn syrup, grits, carbonated beverages (Coca-Cola, 7-Up), hominy, chocolate milk, soy milks, milk shakes, egg nog, corn tortillas, American wines, gin, beer and whiskey.

Don’t buy, drink or eat chewing gums, powdered sugar, lemonade, margarine, catsup, jellies and jams, white distilled vinegar, corn flakes, candies, cake yeast, baking powder, vitamin preparations, corn sugars, bleached flour, gelatin capsules, monosodium glutamate, laundry starch, sauces, toothpastes, adhesives on stamps, stickers and envelopes.

Don’t Eat Fast Foods

Steer clear of fast foods. When you do visit a restaurant, ask about the ingredients used to make the dishes. Let your server know about your corn allergy so the kitchen staff can prepare your food in such a way that you avoid cross-contamination.

Keep Epi-Pens Handy

At the time your doctor or allergist diagnoses you as suffering from corn allergy symptoms, request a prescription for two Epi-Pens. These devices are automatic epinephrine injectors that you carry with you at all times in the event of an inadvertent exposure to corn. As soon as you realize you’re experiencing an allergic reaction, inject yourself and get to the emergency room for further treatment.

Just because you have injected yourself with an Epi-Pen does not mean you are out of danger. While the Epi-Pen is a food allergy treatment, your body's reaction can be biphasic, meaning it comes at you in two separate stages. The second stage can be just as life-threatening as the first and you need to be under medical supervision until your reaction has been resolved.

References

[1] https://www.instah.com/allergies/what-is-corn-allergy-symptoms-and-treatment/ Instah.com: What is Corn Allergy – Symptoms and Treatment

[2] https://allergies.ygoy.com/2009/04/01/what-is-corn-allergy/ Ygoy: What is Corn Allergy?