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Statistics on Death from AML

written by: R. Elizabeth C. Kitchen • edited by: Diana Cooper • updated: 12/29/2010

Are you looking to better understand death from AML leukemia? Here we will discuss the statistics and factors affecting it.

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    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML), sometimes referred to as acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, is a type of cancer that begins within the bone marrow. This cancer grows from the cells that should normally become white blood cells. This is the most common form of leukemia affecting adults. It typically occurs near age 60 and is rare in adults under 40. Men are affected more often than women. While the cause is typically unknown, certain factors are thought to possibly lead to this type of leukemia, such as certain chemotherapy drugs, certain chemicals, radiation, and gene problems. Death from AML leukemia does occur and better understanding the statistics is helpful.

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    Incidence

    In the United States, about 11,000 people are diagnosed every year with AML. This makes the incidence rate about 2.7 per 100,000. The median age of onset is about 65 years of age. The incidence of this type of leukemia, along with myelodysplasia, its precursor, seems to be on the rise, specifically in the 60 years of age and older population.

    Diagnostic percentage estimates regarding age of onset are as follows:

    • 6.3 percent of patients were younger than 20 when diagnosed
    • 7.2 percent of patients were 20 to 34 when diagnosed
    • 7.0 percent of patients were 35 to 44 when diagnosed
    • 10.0 percent of patients were 45 to 54 when diagnosed
    • 13.9 percent of patients were 55 to 64 when diagnosed
    • 22.4 percent of patients were 65 to 74 when diagnosed
    • 24.6 percent of patients were 75 to 84 when diagnosed
    • 8.7 percent of patients were 85 or older when diagnosed
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    Survival Rates

    The five-year survival rate ultimately depends on the sub-type of AML and ranges from 15 to 70 percent. Relapse rates also depend on the sub-type and range from 78 to 33 percent. The overall five-year survival rate is about 23.6 percent per 17 SEER geographic areas. White men average a 21.6 percent survival rate, black men average a 25.3 percent survival rate, white women average a 24.9 percent survival rate, and black women average a 22.7 percent survival rate.

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    Death Rates

    In the United States, 1.2 of all cancer deaths are due to AML leukemia. The average age of death from this type of leukemia was about 71. Death from AML leukemia per age average:

    • 2.9 percent of patients were younger than 20 when they died
    • 3.7 percent of patients were 20 to 34 when they died
    • 4.8 percent of patients were 35 to 44 when they died
    • 8.4 percent of patients were 45 to 54 when they died
    • 13.9 percent of patients were 55 to 64 when they died
    • 26.1 percent of patients were 65 to 74 when they died
    • 29.8 percent of patients were 75 to 84 when they died
    • 10.3 percent of patients were 85 or older when they died
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    Prognosis

    In recent years, treatments have improved and continue to, but as of right now, the overall prognosis is generally poor. The older the patient, the poorer the prognosis in most cases. A patient is said to be in remission when all of their signs and symptoms have completely gone away. If the cancer does not recur within five years of the patient being diagnosed, they are said to be permanently cured. Several factors can affect a patient's overall prognosis:

    • Patient's age
    • Whether the patient has a history of chemotherapy to treat a different cancer in the past
    • Whether the patient's cancer has spread to his or her central nervous system
    • The sub-type of AML
    • Whether the patient has a history of myelodysplastic syndrome or another blood disorder
    • Whether the cancer has come back or been treated before
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    Resources

    Jabbour, E. J. MD, Kantarjian, H. M. MD, and Estey, E. MD. (2006). Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Retrieved on December 22, 2010 from Mayo Clinic Proceedings: http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com/content/81/2/247.long

    Juliusson, G., Autunovic, P., Derolf, A., et al. (2008). Age and Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Real World Data on Decision to Treat and Outcomes from the Swedish Acute Leukemia Registry. Retrieved on December 22, 2010 from the Journal of The American Society of Hematology: http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/cgi/content/full/113/18/4179