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Essential Books on OCD

written by: Debbie Roome • edited by: Paul Arnold • updated: 3/11/2011

There are a number of excellent books on OCD available on the market. Read on to find out about three titles that make essential reading if you want to know more about the disorder and how to deal with it.

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    Coping with OCD by Bruce M Hyman and Troy Dufrene

    Coping with OCD is a compact book that makes for easy reading. Divided into eight chapters, it starts off by defining OCD and encouraging sufferers that they can be helped. Subsequent chapters discuss how to accept the diagnosis of OCD, changing a person’s response to OCD and treatments for OCD.

    The book also takes a look at the fears that often underlie OCD and introduces a number of self-help practices such as breathing and relaxation exercises. A useful inclusion is a section for family members of OCD sufferers. The authors encourage families to learn as much as they can about the condition and never to place blame on the individual with the condition. Open communication is discussed as is the problem of enabling sufferer’s behavior patterns.

    Coping with OCD stands out among books on OCD as it is practical, written in simple English and contains many useful tips about managing the condition.

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    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Help for Children and Adolescents by Mitzi Waltz

    When looking for books on OCD, this one is an excellent choice if the sufferer is a child. The first two chapters define obsessive compulsive disorder and give a list of OCD subtypes and variants along with diagnostic criteria.

    Parents of OCD children often find their lives turned upside down by the ongoing compulsions and obsessions. The author of this book explains in detail how OCD can affect family life and suggests management strategies. Safety is also mentioned, as is substance abuse and dependency.

    The book also offers a detailed analysis of the medical interventions available for children with OCD. This includes a comprehensive list of medications along with their actions and side effects. This is useful for parents who are not familiar with medicinal treatments for OCD in children.

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    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – A Guide for Family, Friends, and Pastors by Robert Collie

    This book is described as a ‘resource for caring persons wanting to be supportive of those suffering from OCD’. The author draws on his 10 years of experience of working with OCD support groups.

    The book is full of personal stories but also offers easy to understand information about OCD. The condition is clearly defined and an appendix mentions the spectrum disorders of trichotillomania, kleptomania, Tourette’s syndrome, body dysmorphic disorder and hypochondriasis.

    The effects of OCD on a person’s life are examined in detail and the implications for relationships are also looked at. The book concludes with a look at how to set up an OCD support group.

    There is a wide choice of books on OCD available and each focuses on different areas. It is a good idea to buy a selection and keep them on hand. They often fill in gaps in knowledge and help individuals and families to deal more positively with OCD.

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    Reference

    Coping with OCD by Bruce M Hyman and Troy Dufrene, New Harbinger Publications, 2008

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – Help for Children and Adolescents by Mitzi Waltz, O’Reilly & Associates, 2000

    Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – A Guide for Family, Friends, and Pastors by Robert Collie, The Haworth Press, 2005