Pin Me

Medical Frauds, Fakes, and Hoaxes: Parasites, Cancer, and the Zapper (Part 2)

written by: Robyn Broyles • edited by: Leigh A. Zaykoski • updated: 12/15/2008

What harm can alternative therapy do? Learn how one alternative treatment for cancer and other diseases causes real harm to patients. Part 2 of a two-part series.

  • slide 1 of 3

    The Clark Zapper and Syncrometer

    Clark has invented devices for "detecting" and "curing" cancer by supposedly killing the parasites. The "Zapper" applies low-voltage electrical currents to the body. Allegedly, it produces electrical energy on a frequency that kills adult worms without damaging the patient's tissues. The "Syncrometer" is used as a testing device for cancer in lieu of blood tests (Barrett, 2006).

    There is no debate about Clark's claims in the medical community. They are universally regarded as false. For example, the leading naturopath Joseph Pizzorno called her claims about the effectiveness of the Zapper "preposterous," while physician Stephen Barrett, who operates the website Quackwatch.org and others, calls them "bizarre" (Barrett, 2006). Alternative health proponent Ralph Moss wrote a "scathing" reivew of the writings of Hulda Clark in his book, Herbs Against Cancer: History and Controversy (Dunn, 2000).

  • slide 2 of 3

    Real Harm Done to People

    Clark's ineffective "treatments" are not neutral; they do real harm to patients. Clark tells her clients to stop conventional treatments for cancer and other diseases in favor of her methods. Because of her claims that the presence of "toxic" metal in the mouth plays a role in the disease process, she recommends her patients have fillings removed. According to one account (Chavez, 2007), the removal of teeth interfered with nutrition for one patient, who eventually died of her cancer after treatment by Clark. Clark's treatments are expensive and include supplements, dental work, and other costs in addition to the use of the Zapper and Syncrometer devices.

    Clark's currently treats clients at her clinic Century Nutrition in Tijuana, Mexico. Clark has faced legal trouble stemming from her practice both in the United States and in Mexico (Barrett, 2006).

    Cancer patients are often desperate and frustrated with conventional treatments, which often have devastating side effects. Some patients, looking for hope and control in the face of the despair and confusion of cancer, are vulnerable to quack treatments such as the Clark Zapper. If this nonsensical treatment protocol were effective, the world would be filled with evidence in the form of people whose cancer was cured, and mainstream medicine would have taken notice. People looking for treatment options should protect themselves by arming themselves with information, especially before turning to "alternative" health providers.

  • slide 3 of 3

    References

    Continued from Part 1.