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Superbug Zapper

written by: MandaSpring • edited by: Anurag Ghosh • updated: 12/10/2008

Wouldn’t it be great if the same bug zapper technology was used in heath care to ‘zap’ harmful bacteria and viruses before taking their toll on the human body? That technology is becoming a reality.

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    We’ve all heard the jokes about front porch bug zappers from several comedians. But have you heard about a bug zapper that targets diseases? It’s under development right now. This Superbug Zapper goes after both bacteria and viruses and kills them before they can further harm the patient. Imagine an instrument in health care technology that destroys only the virus or bacteria causing a disease and not the surrounding tissues! Instead of radiation or chemo therapy that can kill the immune system, this method of zapping concentrates only on the particular virus or bacteria that are causing the infections, making cures not only possible, but rapid.

    Can it really work?

    Acting somewhat like a surgeon’s scalpel the new bug zapper targets only the infection. It kills the source and prevents the spread of deadly diseases from AIDS to Staph infection. This health care technology promises to cure diseases as soon as they can be identified. Almost like removing a moldy spot from an otherwise good piece of cheese, the Superbug Zapper eliminates the source of the infection and does not harm any other part of the body in the process. Like surgery, it extracts the affected area and removes the poisoned “bugs” to leave the patient without much chance of recurrence.

    How does it work?

    The Superbug Zapper works on the principle that killing the pathogens themselves is better than killing the surrounding healthy tissue. According to Arizona physicist K.T. Tsen, “We use the laser to create large vibrations on the protein coat of the bacteria or virus, exciting it to such a high-energy state that the weak links on the capsid, or outer shell, break off” thus killing the pathogen without damaging the surrounding tissues. “Based on our progress so far, I’m very optimistic—the laser might be in hospitals within a couple of years,” Tsen added, hopefully. The Superbug Zapper has shown a great deal of promise during testing.

    Overview

    Medical experts and researchers have concentrated for years on treating the diseases that take such a toll on mankind. Chemo-therapy, radiation, surgeries and antibiotics have all enjoyed some success over the years. Unfortunately, they come with side effects that can be as bad as the initial infection. If Dr. Tsen’s theory is correct and can be put into practical use, many of the deadly infections we now have to live with could become just bad memories.