Pin Me

High Resistance Interval Training

written by: SimonHaestoe • edited by: Cheryl Gabbert • updated: 7/6/2010

This article presents the benefits of Hiit over regular cardio, shows you how to do- and gives you a schedule to get started with HIIT.

  • slide 1 of 4

    What Is High Intensive Interval Training?

    Do you know HIIT? It stands for High Intensive Interval Training. It's gruesome, but if you want to burn fat nothing is better. Your metabolism will increase and, better yet, do so not only during but after the workout.

    You're going to have to work hard to get this kind of metabolism, though. You have to go all out, meaning nothing less than 100%. Anything below that will decrease the effects much more radically than you might think. But you can take comfort in that you will rest in between the 100% rushes. Yes, the rest will be as "extreme" as the high intensity was extreme.

  • slide 2 of 4

    How To Perform This Kind of Exercise Properly

    You're going to run for 30 seconds and then walk for 30 seconds. What you may take further comfort in is that when you're not running you absolutely shouldn't do anything even remotely close to running, or jogging. You should be walking. The reason is because the effect of this type of training is in the contrast between 100% rushes and calm, calm walking.

    I suggest that you, while walking, really take the time to calm down your body fully. You should do this not only to maximize the contrast, but to really get some rest in between. Mostly to maximize the contrast, of course, but at least as long as you barely can stand this training - it might feel good for you to really, really rest in between. I suggest in this 30 second span, every time you have it you concentrate on finding what calms you down the most. Use your common sense. What calms you? With a deep, full breath you cannot be stressed. Drop your shoulders. Loosen your face. If you feel these things are impossible to do just after pushing yourself to the max, then just trust that it's possible - because it is; and it's really worth going for.

  • slide 3 of 4

    If It Isn't Tough, For One Reason Or Another You're Not Pushing Yourself As Hard As You Should

    If you think, or experience, this kind of training is not tough, you're not doing it the right way. It's a fact that the harder you push yourself the better your results get. If you're not going fully, you're working out super-hard while practically not getting any results whatsoever - in HIIT. You go full out, or you train something else than HIIT.

    What I said above is a good way to measure if you're doing HIIT in a way that will give you results. If you feel like throwing up while running and are able to calm down while "resting" you're doing it right.

  • slide 4 of 4

    A Schedule For You To Get Started With Your Training

    To end this article, I better give you a little schedule. I suggest the first time you do HIIT, you do 3-4 100% rushes. The next time you step it up, and the next time after that. By the way, if you cannot go for 100% the first time it doesn't matter as this is a long term thing. But -- make sure you follow your own timeline for this. I can guarantee you that procrastinating going 100% is going to make it practically impossible. If you do it, you're probably not going to get results from this.

    I hope this article has urged you to start doing high resistance interval training!