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Dental First Aid Kits for Travelers

written by: DaniellaNicole • edited by: Leigh A. Zaykoski • updated: 11/24/2009

Traditional first aid kits typically overlook including supplies for dental first aid. Dental first aid kits for travelers thus become an important and handy item to have, in addition to a traditional first aid kit. Travelers may not have ready access to dental care if a emergency occurs.

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    A dental first aid kit for travelers may be made using an Altoids or other candy tin as a case. However, other small containers will work just as well. Items such as a zippered sandwich bag, a plastic soap container (for travel) or a small cosmetics bag would work, too. Before taking a dental kit on an airplane, regulations regarding the components should be checked.

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    Components

    The most common components included in commercially-prepared or home made dental first aid kits are:

    • Dental floss
    • Temporary dental cement
    • Tweezers
    • Oil of Cloves
    • Dental wax
    • Cotton balls
    • Cotton swabs
    • Salt (for a salt water cleaning)
    • Motrin, Ibuprofen or Advil
    • Anbesol or other oral pain-relieving gel

    Traditional first aid kits may contain some of these items, but usually do not include many. Dental first aid components may be added to a regular first aid kit – and should be.

    Other items to consider including are a dental mirror, infection treatment/prevention, and a pouch of water for oral cleansing.

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    How to Make Dental First Aid Kits for Travelers

    Whether for personal use or to be given as a gift, dental first aid kits can be easily made with a few simple and inexpensive components. Many commercially-prepared kits cost around $20, so a homemade kit is a better option for those wishing to save money.

    The simplest way to make a dental first aid kit is to consider the owner’s dental health needs as well as the places they will be taking the kit. If dental care is readily accessible, pain relief and wound-cleaning may be the focus. However, if they will be in the wilds, a more comprehensive kit that includes temporary dental cement and infection treatment or prevention would be more appropriate.

    Be sure to keep instructions in the kit regarding the dental use of the various products. An emergency guide has been prepared by Dr. Dan Peterson. As stated in the guide, neither the kit nor the instructions are intended to replace treatment by a dentist. They are only for temporary, emergency use in situations in which there will be a delay before you can get to a dentist.

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    Resouces:

    Amazon.com - dental kits (component reference) http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=dental+kits&x=0&y=0

    SafariQuip - First Aid/Dental kits (component reference) http://www.safariquip.co.uk/acatalog/First_Aid_Kits.html

    Emergency Guide. Dr. Dan Peterson. http://www.dentalgentlecare.com/emergency_dental_ideas.htm