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Prescription Treatment Options for Hemorrhoids

written by: Rochelle Connery • edited by: BStone • updated: 4/17/2011

Doctors sometimes recommend a prescription hemorrhoid treatment for treating hemorrhoids when other avenues have been unsuccessful in providing relief for the patient. Learn which prescription treatments are available and what side effects you might experience.

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    What Do Most Hemorrhoid Treatments Contain?

    In most cases, hydrocortisone is the active ingredient in a prescription hemorrhoid treatment. Thus, you’ll see this listed in most of the leading prescription drugs, whether they be a suppository or a cream. Basically, topical hydrocortisone, which is a corticosteroid, works by relieving the pain associated with hemorrhoids and lessens the severity of the side effects hemorrhoids cause in the body.

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    Anusol HC

    Anusol HC is a cream prescribed to treat the itching and swelling that you experience with hemorrhoids. Although many over-the-counter creams achieve the same result with lesser hemorrhoids, you may find that you need a cream with prescription-grade hydrocortisone to experience any relief.

    Apply this cream with clean fingers directly onto the affected area. Your doctor will prescribe the exact dose you should use.

    Side effects with this hydrocortisone cream are fairly mild. Typical experiences may include irritation or feeling dry. You might experience more severe side effects, such as a rash, excessive itching or irritation, burning or bleeding. However, if you have experienced these same symptoms before taking Anusol HC, it’s not as likely that these are actual side effects.

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    Proctofoam

    For a prescription hemorrhoid remedy with no commonly known side effects, go for Proctofoam. It also uses hydrocortisone as its main ingredient.

    But instead of administering it with your fingers, you should squeeze the foam onto a disposable tissue. This might be preferable and more hygienic to those who have an aversion to using their fingers to apply cream with their bare hands.

    Serious side effects are pretty much the same for this prescription as any other hemorrhoid treatment. Itching, rash, burning and anal pain, although fairly uncommon, are still a risk.

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    Nupercainal Ointment

    If you do not wish to take a hydrocortisone prescription hemorrhoid medication, you might want to take a dibucaine-based one instead. This particular prescription works as an anesthetic, which means it numbs the area for a time and helps you forget you even have hemorrhoids.

    Use Nupercainal Ointment by cleansing the area with soap and water, drying it, then dabbing some ointment on toilet paper or a disposable tissue. Wipe it over the affected area, but don’t let it actually get into the rectum.

    This particular drug does not pose a risk of common side effects. Serious side effects are pretty much the same as any hemorrhoid treatment and include rash, burning, itching and irritation.

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    Proctocream HC

    Proctocream HC is similar to Proctofoam, except that it’s in cream form rather than foam form. Hydrocortisone is also its main ingredient, and it works by reducing the inflammation caused by hemorrhoids.

    You can actually apply this cream into the rectum, unlike some of the other prescription hemorrhoid treatment options. Do so after you’ve taken a stool, if possible, and make sure you’re wearing appropriate undergarments for the duty.

    Use clean hands to insert the cream, or use the applicator if it comes with one. Always wash your hands after using it.

    Side effects may include more than just burning and itching. You might experience weight gain, stomach pain, an increase in hair growth (in places where you don’t want an increase) and bleeding.

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    Sources

    Drugs.com: Anusol Cream

    Drugs.com: Proctofoam

    Drugs.com: Nupercainal Ointment

    Drugs.com: Proctocream-HC

    About.com: Hemorrhoids