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Getting Help for Adults with Asperger's

written by: Paula Davis • edited by: Paul Arnold • updated: 8/23/2010

Many adults with autism are diagnosed with Asperger's, and these people have behavior and problem solving difficulties. For such people daily living requires assistance and a bit of help.

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    Assisting with Difficulties in Relationships and Work Environments

    With regard to employment, adults with Asperger’s Autism have to be placed in a work place that is suitable for the social and employment skills that they posses. Sometimes in getting help for an adult with Asperger's within the workplace there is a need for a job coach to be present in order to keep the individual on task.

    Other employees need to be accepting of the special needs required by this individual. It is important the correct workplace is found for the individual because he/she truly does want to fit in and be a part of the team. Most Asperger’s Autistic adults can find work in computer-related fields because that is where many of their strengths and interests lie.

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    Planning for Changes in Living Arrangements for Adults with Asperger's

    Living arrangements are a major issue facing autistic adults. Most of the autistic population has to be supervised around the clock to ensure safety. Most people with Asperger’s Autism have very little sense of danger. Additionally, the adult with Asperger’s Autism is not truly age appropriate so what may be considered dangerous to a “normal" adult is not considered in the same manner.

    Living in a structured environment with reminders of grooming skills that need to be completed daily and daily living skills reiterated are important and a necessity in order to help adults with Asperger's Disorder function as close to normal as possible.

    It is fortunate that many group homes provide the assistance required, so a routine life with structure can begin upon taking up residence in the group home. There will be a learning curve with the staff as to how to effectively assist the new resident so that positive outcomes in any given situation are “ready when needed."

    The sooner appropriate living arrangements are made for the young adult with Asperger’s Autism the more settled and comfortable the individual will feel about his/her life. I will tell you it is one of the hardest things we have ever had to do, but we feel it is one the best things that we could do for our son. We know now that when something happens to me or my husband he has his own home, he has a group of friends, and most importantly he is in a safe environment that will help him daily.

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    Where Finances Come into Play

    Now let’s talk financial assistance. It is important to understand that a person who has Asperger’s Autism may not be able to become employed with a job that pays for their special needs. Let’s face it: good jobs today are even hard to find for a person with a degree.

    Now suppose there are 20 people on the list for one job, and let’s throw in a person with Asperger’s Autism who is also an applicant - will the autistic person stand a chance?

    Everything in life is a gamble but in this instance I think it is better to plan ahead financially just as it is better to plan ahead regarding living arrangements. If possible a trust account should be opened (by a legal attorney) which will be funded by the parent/guardian before adulthood. This will enable funds (that have been set aside for the purpose of helping to maintain the individual later in life) to grow.

    In this way should something happen to one or both parents, at least two of the biggest concerns for the adult living with Asperger’s Autism have been taken care of - living arrangements and financial arrangements. Both of these items are huge and will take away a lot of stress from the parents as they know they did the best they could do for their autistic family member.

    Disclaimer: The information contained herein represents my own personal experiences and views and does not reflect the needs of any one individual, nor does it reflect the views of Bright Hub, Inc. and/or its contributors and editors. Nor is this intended to replace any kind of professional medical and/or psychological advice, so please contact an appropriate professional source before starting any particular treatment and/or intervention procedures.