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Pain Free Living: Arthritis and Reflexology

written by: MandaSpring • edited by: Diana Cooper • updated: 9/19/2010

If you are always in pain from arthritis, you may not realize there are safe and effective methods to relieve it. Discover the world of possibilities through this article on arthritis and reflexology.

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    Arthritis is a terrible disease that affects millions of people world-wide. The joints become swollen and stiff, making mobility very limited. A victim of arthritis loses their ability to do simple tasks, such as writing, opening a jar, or even walking without pain.

    Cortisone is the most common medication used by doctors for treating arthritis, but it isn’t one hundred percent effective and can have side effects. Pain killers, either by prescription or over the counter, can be limited in their usefulness and also have side effects that make them a poor choice of treatment for many patients.

    Reflexology is being used to treat many illnesses, arthritis included. By massaging or rubbing or manipulating the feet and hands of a patient, the reflexologist can cause responses in various areas of the body. It can increase nerve activity or slow it down. It can increase blood flow or limit it. Reflexology can increase or diminish hormone production and organ functions, as well. It is becoming a useful tool in treating many different diseases, including arthritis. No matter how you look at it there are positive results; so learning more about arthritis and reflexology can prove to be beneficial in so many ways.

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    How Can Reflexology Help With Arthritis?

    The connection between arthritis and reflexology.

    Depending on where the arthritis is located, its cause may differ. For example, rheumatoid arthritis is when the body attacks its own systems, resulting in damage to joints and immobility. Arthritis of the spine enlarges the vertebrae and thins the discs that lie between them. The pressure on nerves is very painful and debilitating.

    In the past, some patients had their joints surgically scraped to remove the excess calcium deposits that form with arthritis. Cortisone is now the usual treatment.

    Arthritis and reflexology can be a good combination, in that reflexology is being used as a treatment for arthritis. By properly stimulating the nerves in the feet and hands, the pain can decrease and mobility can be improved.

    Many arthritis sufferers have become tired of medications and their side effects. Since reflexology has no side effects and can be a valuable method of treating the pain and stiffness that go with an arthritic condition, it’s being used by many patients to get relief that has otherwise evaded them.

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